Video: Feed Basics for Consumers

Posted on March 5, 2007

John Mahoney of InstantInformation has kicked off a series of videos he calls Practical RSS. The aim of the videos is to teach potential feed consumers what the benefits of feeds are and how they can use the technology to better their web experience. The first video explains what feeds are and how to subscribe to and read feeds in very basic terms. The explanation is a good one and I, for one, am looking forward to more Practical RSS videos in the future. To check out show #1 just click the image below and if you want to make sure to catch all of the latest videos in the series you should subscribe to John’s blog (yes, I know he’s not using FeedBurner yet - I’m on it).


Search this Site

Lijit Search

Latest Tech & Biz Buzz




Comments

Leave a Comment

If you would like to make a comment, please fill out the form below.

Name (required)

Email (required)

Website

Comments

2 Comments so far
  1. piersj March 6, 2007 5:04 am

    Really great to see this type of video being put together, there is a definite need for RSS to be explained to potential customers as right now people dont get it. We surveyed people on the street here in the UK to see what they thought RSS was, you can see the results here:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1QnqJPvQ_k

  2. Eric Olson March 6, 2007 10:52 am

    Great video! Some of the responses were priceless. However, I would be curious to see what the reaction would be if you started talking about services like MyYahoo. A lot of people use that service and have no idea that it’s actually a feed reader. In the end of the day users don’t have to know anything about feeds/RSS to use it.

    E-mail is a great parallel. It’s pretty complicated on the back end and the majority of users have no idea how it really works. All they know is they can send a message to someone and it gets to them. If all people know about feeds is that they can get all of the content they want in one place that they control than that’s all they need to know.

    Also, I wonder if you would get different responses if you asked what feeds are instead of what RSS is. Most people don’t know the acronym but they may know what a feed is.